Review: Finding Teddy 2 – got a big big bite

Review: Finding Teddy 2 – got a big big bite


Windows PC, Mac, Steam

Game Name:

Finding Teddy 2


LookAtMyGame, Plug In Digital




Action, Adventure, RPG

Release Date:

April 2nd, 2015

Finding Teddy 2 – What We Think:

When I saw the title “Finding Teddy 2,” my first thought was “Is this going to be a children’s game?” Some swift research reinforced the adage that first impressions are often erroneous. Finding Teddy 2, like its predecessor, is a sizable 2D adventure game with some qualities that will be familiar to fans of the Legend of Zelda series. Finding Teddy 2 packs exploration, puzzle-solving and combat into its sizable world.

Falling into the Action

Finding Teddy 2 doesn’t spend much time setting up any kind of background narrative; the game opens with the protagonist, a young girl, playing a video game in what appears to be her bedroom. After the lights go out, you can explore the adjoining corridors before passing through a door that leads to a lengthy drop into an area titled “Graveyard,” a somber beginning for your adventure, though thankfully later areas take on less grim tones.

Finding Teddy 2 Cave

The gameplay of Finding Teddy 2 involves a classic mixture of platforming, 2D swordplay and exploration. The story’s heroine controls well, and deaths result from the fault of the player rather than any shortcomings in the game’s design. Combat is well executed; figuring out each weakness of some of the tougher enemies and then learning to exploit them swiftly makes for enjoyable melees. As enemies respawn, combat can get a little repetitive, but it’s generally fun to fight your way through each area, so I doubt there will be many complaints here.

There You Go Again

Exploration is where Finding Teddy 2 shines, and the world feels very much like that of a classic RPG adventure game. You’ll be forced to bypass areas that will become accessible later when you find a way to traverse water or get through guarded doors. The old thrill of knowing that the item you just found will unlock multiple paths you passed by earlier on your journey is still a solid reward for your adventuring efforts, and Finding Teddy 2 delivers this in abundance.

Finding Teddy 2 Guardian

Augmenting the traditional item-hunting adventuring is an interesting musical system called the musicom, which allows you to communicate with NPCs and unlock pathways by playing notes. The musicom comes with a lexicon to tell you the meaning of various combinations of notes. To add even more item-hunting into the mix, you must also find each of the notes in order to be able to play them. Finding notes and figuring out what to say with your musical messaging makes for some enjoyable adventuring and puzzle-solving.

Sounds Like Something’s Out There

Visually, Finding Teddy 2 manages to do a great deal with its simple, pixel art-based graphics. The world is varied and often beautiful; when it isn’t, it’s consistently atmospheric. Each area also hosts a unique ecosystem of refreshingly disparate enemy types to face. The sound and music of the game are also exceptional; your character clunks around with satisfyingly heavy footsteps, and an excellent soundtrack creates a haunting atmosphere to some of the areas. The game also knows when silence is of benefit; some areas favor sound effects over background music, lending a lonely feel to some parts of the adventure.

Finding Teddy 2 Statue

Oh Let Me Be Your Teddy Bear

Finding Teddy 2 is a surprisingly well-packed adventure with puzzles and exploration in abundance. The satisfying feeling of finding ways to explore previously barred areas is an old one in gaming but it’s executed well here. Imaginatively designed environments and an engaging soundtrack provide additional incentives to explore this well crafted 2D adventure.

Finding Teddy 2 – official site

Get Finding Teddy 2 on Steam

Rating: ★★★★☆ 

Watch the trailer for Finding Teddy 2 below:

Kit Goodliffe

Kit is a freelance writer specialising in gaming, film and digital media. His passion for games began at a very young age and has only grown since then. Kit is IGR's U.K. correspondent.

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